The Future of Internet

the Death of the Phone Call

Posted in Behavior by markpeak on 2 สิงหาคม 2010

บทความใน Wired พูดถึง lifestyle การใช้ชีวิตที่การโทรศัพท์มีจำนวนครั้งลดลง โดยมีการสื่อสารแบบอื่นเข้ามาแทน

อันนั้นใครๆ ก็รู้กัน แต่บทความนี้เจ๋งตรงมันอธิบายที่มาที่ไปได้ ว่าเกิดจากพฤติกรรมของการสื่อสารแต่ละชนิดต่างหาก (และโทรศัพท์ไม่ใช่การสื่อสารที่คนชอบนัก เพราะมัน interrupt)

The telephone, in other words, doesn’t provide any information about status, so we are constantly interrupting one another. The other tools at our disposal are more polite. Instant messaging lets us detect whether our friends are busy without our bugging them, and texting lets us ping one another asynchronously. (Plus, we can spend more time thinking about what we want to say.) For all the hue and cry about becoming an “always on” society, we’re actually moving away from the demand that everyone be available immediately.

In fact, the newfangled media that’s currently supplanting the phone call might be the only thing that helps preserve it. Most people I know coordinate important calls in advance using email, text messaging, or chat (r u busy?). An unscheduled call that rings on my phone fails the conversational Turing test: It’s almost certainly junk, so I ignore it. (Unless it’s you, Mom!)

Clive Thompson on the Death of the Phone Call

มีการตอบกลับหนึ่งครั้ง

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. To'M@ZZu ครับ said, on 3 สิงหาคม 2010 at 8:32

    ไอ่คนเขียนมันไม่เคยทำธุรกิจกับอาเฮียอาตี๋ แน่ ๆ

    แค่เค้ายอมใช้มือถือ เรียกว่าหรูแล้วนะเนี่ย

    (มือถือ มือ contact ระบบ Masking Tape อยู่ด้านหลังด้วย)


ใส่ความเห็น

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: